30 Tir | The street of religions

30 Tir | The street of religions

30 Tir | Photo by Tannaz Akbari

30 Tir is one of the original and old neighborhoods of Tehran. It can be said that it is one of the unique streets in the world since it has a mosque, a Zoroastrian Fire-Temple, a synagogue and two churches. This beautiful and old street is one of the richest touristic sites of Tehran.

Attractions of 30Tir Street

Being one of the old and original neighborhoods of Tehran, this cobblestone street has a historical texture and precious buildings and museums.

National Museum of Iran

It is the most noteworthy museum on 30Tir Street, which explores 30,000 years of habitation in the region.

National Museum of Iran Destimap

National Museum of Iran Destimap | Wikipedia

Abgineh Museum

Up in the street is the Glassware and Ceramic Museum of Iran (Abgineh Museum), which displays pottery from 4000 B.C until  the modern ones.

Abgineh Museum

Abgineh Museum | Wikipedia

Saint Peter’s Evangelical Holiness Church

This Church dates back to Qajar’s dynasty and has a combination of Iranian and European architecture.

Abgineh Museum

Abgineh Museum | Wikipedia

Haim Synagogue

It was built during Qajar’s dynasty, when Ahmad Shah was king in 1913, and is one of the oldest synagogues in Tehran. During the time of World War II, it hosted Polish Jewish refugees. The increase of these refugees in 1940, resulted in the construction of a new synagogue next to it, named Daniel synagogue.

Haim Synagogue

Haim Synagogue | Wikipedia

Adrian Fire-Temple

The Adrian Fire-Temple was constructed in 1916, during Qajar’s dynasty, with the financial help from Iranian Zoroastrians living in India. The fire in this place was brought from Bahram Fire-Temple in Yazd, which is believed that the fire had been burnt for more than 1500 years. On its right side, Firooz Bahram School is located which is for Zoroastrian students.

Adrian Fire-Temple | Wikipedia

Adrian Fire-Temple | Wikipedia

Hazrat-e-Ibrahim Mosque

This mosque was built 70 years ago, during the second Pahlavi era. The structure of this beautiful mosque, is a combination of Iranian and Islamic architecture.

Hazrat-e-Ibrahim Mosque

Hazrat-e-Ibrahim Mosque | Pinterest

Saint Mary Armenian Church

 Further up in the street is Saint Mary Church, which was built due to the rise of the number of the Armenian refugees, after the Armenian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire.

Saint Mary Armenian Church

Saint Mary Armenian Church | Wikipedia

The reason of the naming

30Tir Street was formerly known as Qavam ol-Saltaneh Street, who was the prime minister in the Imperial time and his home and work office was in this street (now transferred to Abgineh Museum). 30 Tir (21 July) was named after the date of the massive protest against Shah in 1932.

Tehran’s Food Street

on 30 Tir Street, there are various food vendors along with some cafes and restaurants. You can find a variety of delicious, mouthwatering dishes from traditional Persian foods like Kebabs to fast foods and international foods like Turkish, Indian and Lebanese, along with freshly squeezed fruit juices, coffee and tea. These shops are open until late at night, so the nightlife of Tehran in this delicious food street can be really enjoyable.

 It should be mentioned that there are many attractions close to 30 Tir Street. Just off 30 Tir on Imam Khomeini Street, is the magnificent gate of National Garden that includes different buildings like Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Malek Museum and Library and Behind Post and Communication Museum is Ebrat Museum, which was formerly a political prison. All these features make 30 Tir a must-see spot in Tehran.

* Written by Arefeh Firouzan.

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Official Website: N/A Entrance fee: N/A
Wikipedia: Click here Name(s) in Persian: خیابان سی تیر
UNESCO Website: N/A Public transportation availability: Yes
Province: Tehran Accommodation availability: Yes
Phone: N/A Facilities: Yes
Working days: All days Restaurant & Cafe availability: Yes
Opening hours: :N/ABest time to visit: All Seasons

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